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Collins meets with White House to discuss prison reform

“The Prison Reform and Redemption Act paves the way for healthier people to build stronger, safer neighborhoods at a time when Congress and the White House have the opportunity to be agents of positive change in this space.”

dougcollins

WASHINGTON—Rep. Doug Collins (R-Ga.) met with White House leaders Thursday to discuss plans to lower recidivism rates among federal offenders through vocational and other programs. Collins introduced the Prison Reform and Redemption Act this July and has been an active voice among conservatives working for prison reform.

Jared Kushner, a senior advisor to President Trump, led the meeting, which included Labor Secretary Alex Acosta, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson and Sens. John Cornyn (R-Texas) and Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.), among others. As part of the small group of elected officials invited to offer legislative solutions, Collins said that Washington owes it to Americans to make progress on the issue.

Attorney General warns about hurricane relief scams

gaseal

 

ATLANTA, GA – Attorney General Chris Carr is warning consumers to be on the lookout for scams in the wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

 

Bogus Charities

 

     Seeing or hearing about the devastation caused by a natural disaster evokes our sympathies and our desire to help those affected. Unfortunately, scammers realize this and do not hesitate to take advantage of people’s heightened emotions. They may pose as reputable charities soliciting donations and target consumers through unsolicited emails, telemarketing calls or by knocking on their doors. They often create legitimate-looking websites that have similar names as actual charities, sometimes even using the actual logo of a reputable relief organization. To make sure you are donating to a legitimate charity, our office recommends the following tips:

Just released, "Haunted North Georgia"

New book coming just in time for Halloween

 

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Photo/ historypress.com

   Haunted North Georgia will be available for purchase in early October.

 

By David R. Altman

Books & Writers Editor

 

If you’re always looking for a good ghost story—even one you can check out for yourself--there’s a new book coming in October that will be right down your alley.

It’s called Haunted North Georgia, written by author Jim Miles of Warner Robins, and it’s part of a three-book series about ghost stories from each of Georgia’s 159 counties.

This book is an easy read. In fact, for those young adult readers who might want to do a book report on the topic of ghost stories, Miles has made it very easy.

The north Georgia edition actually covers more than what most of us consider north Georgia, as it conveys stories from Rockdale County to Cobb County and, yes, those counties closer to home, including Pickens, Gilmer and Fannin.

Blaze engulfs south Pickens home

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photo/Angela Reinhardt

A Pickens County fireman battles a Wednesday morning fire off Highway 108. 

 

     Pickens County crews responded to a structure fire just before 10 a.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 13th on Eaton Road, just off Highway 108. 

     The fire engulfed the double-wide mobile home, and the structure is being considered a complete loss. At least one person was in the home when the fire started from a front bedroom, but she was able to get out of the residence with no serious injuries. 

      City of Jasper fire crews provided backup. 

Catheads to buttermilk: The business of biscuits

biscuit-maker

BIG, FLUFFY, AND DON’T SCRIMP ON THE BUTTER - Biscuit Maker owner Bambi Winfrey and her crew bake hundreds of biscuits from the carry-out only location every morning. Breakfast biscuits are sold to hungry, on-the-go customers at convenience stores, restaurants, and fast-food chains across the county.

Damon Howell / Photo

 

Just before 9 a.m. on Friday, Betty McCoy, the cook at West End General Store, was filling orders as quickly as they came in. Fresh eggs were cracked. Bacon sizzled on the flat iron. A hot pan of cathead biscuits was coming out of the oven. 

A few customers got their breakfast on a plate and bellied up at tables inside, but most stood in line at the register to take their foil-wrapped rations to go. 

The scene mimicked so many other convenience stores and fast food chains in the morning – a frenzied rush of people who want to eat breakfast quickly before the work day, coupled with old timers and early risers who’d rather sit and enjoy. Each meal is different – some have tenderloin, some country ham, others bacon and eggs or gravy - but the common thread is the biscuit, a point of culinary pride for Southerners that evokes passionate discussion and clear-cut opinions about what makes one good. 

Only a few generations ago biscuits were made at home by women, a mom or grandma, but the landscape has changed